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  • MeToo

     

    Advocates for military women are planning a #MeToo demonstration outside the Pentagon next month to add their voices to the movement that has put a spotlight on workplace sexual harassment and extinguished the careers of powerful men in entertainment, media, technology and politics.

  • Amputees in High Heels

     

    Researchers from the Department of Veterans Affairs have played roles in a number of scientific and medical breakthroughs that have had a profound impact on modern life: the liver transplant, the nicotine patch and artificial lungs, to name just three.

    And now, as they seek to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population of wounded and disabled Veterans from the current era of war, VA design experts say they're going beyond barebones medical needs and aiming to help Vets live more comfortably, with technology adapted to their lifestyle and interests. It's work that requires them to listen to Veterans more closely and involve them and their feedback in the development process to a greater extent than ever before.

    One example of this work can be seen at the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Veterans Affairs, where they've come up with a 3D-printed ankle and foot device for a prosthetic leg to give amputees adjustable heels.

    Thanks to this research, stilettos are no longer out of the question for Veteran amputees. Outside researchers at Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere have developed similar devices, but Dr. Andrew Hansen of the Minneapolis VA Healthcare System said the VA's "Shape & Roll" prosthetic foot is unisex.

    "This study focused on high heels, but the results work just as well for cowboy boots," Hansen said in a VA release.

    The adjustable-heel prosthetic was an example of VA's commitment to research in areas that haven't been pursued by the private sector, said Dr. Rachel Ramoni, the VA's chief research and development officer.

    "Actually, there's a couple of things going on with 3D printing; you can print a foot for every type of shoe," Ramoni told Military.com.

    The foot-ankle prosthetic also demonstrates a willingness at the VA to take feedback from wounded and disabled Veterans themselves on what they need to accommodate the lifestyles they wish to return to or pursue, she said.

    Ramoni also cited current research into upper-arm prosthetics for women as an example of this work.

    "That's a small segment of the population; it's a small market," Ramoni said. "It's not an area where somebody would say 'Well, it's an obvious money making opportunity.' So it might not be good business, but it's the right thing to do."

    The other challenge with research on upper-arm prosthetics for women is that so little work has been done in the field previously, Ramoni said.

    "The sizing of the prosthetic is a big deal," she said, and "we don't know about women's upper arm satisfaction, because all of the surveys were designed for men."

    The work on adjustable heels and the upper-arm prosthetic research are among more than 2,000 projects involving 3,400 researchers now underway at the Office of Research and Development. ORD operates on a budget of about $722 million from the VA, supplemented by contributions from the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense and others, for a total of about $1.5 billion, Ramoni said.

    The money is being spent with a new emphasis on listening to Vets regarding where they want the research to go, Ramoni said.

    A Disabled Vet Tackles Design

    Dr. Rory Cooper was an Army sergeant in Germany in 1980 when he lost the use of his legs from spinal cord injuries in a bicycle accident.

    He now is a director and senior research career scientist for the Human Engineering Research Laboratories, a VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Center and home of the VA Technology Transfer Assistance Program.

    Cooper is also a Paralyzed Veterans of America distinguished professor at the University of Pittsburgh. As such, he is an advocate for what leaders in his field call "participatory action engineering," or, more simply put, listening to the people you're trying to help.

    Cooper said his frustration with the ivory-tower approach to human engineering grew out of his own experience trying to get a better wheelchair.

    "I was trying to solve some of my own problems," he said of his approach to design research. He found that he and other Veterans often were in "isolation" from the researchers.

    Cooper said that surveys and talking to the Veterans themselves are "ways to initiate the design process, rather than having somebody sitting at their desk or surfing their computer, trying to understand what you want."

    Designers and researchers should "start by asking [the Veterans]... to prioritize," Cooper said.

    He said his current research was focused on robotics, artificial intelligence and what he called "adaptive reconditioning technology" to help Veterans participate in sports and recreation.

    One such example: a robotic bed. One of the little-known everyday problems for disabled Veterans, and their caregivers, is getting in and out bed, Cooper said.

    "If you don't have the use of your arms or legs, or you're weakened, that's a huge problem," he said.

    The bed is currently a work in progress, but Cooper said the initial thought was to have a "chair-into-bed kind of a docking system, and the chair kind of puts you into the bed while a conveyer pulls you into the bed."

    A Secret Weapon: Veterans

    The VA has a major advantage over the teaching hospitals and the private sector in conducting wide-ranging tests and surveys that require huge numbers of volunteers, said Ramoni, the VA's chief research officer.

    "Veterans are absolutely core to our program," she said. "Our program is able to make these discoveries because of the thousands of VA patients volunteering here," and "what we do is driven by their needs."

    Outside researchers, she said, often ask how they can learn from current VA practices and how VA scientists get so many people involved in the development process.

    "We say what we have is not something you can learn; that you have a population of Veterans who want to continue to serve their fellow Veterans and the entire nation by participating in these studies," Ramoni said. "It's just amazing to me how committed Veterans are to continuing to serve and continuing to make discoveries that will help everybody."

    The Next Big Breakthrough

    Ramoni noted that VA's ongoing Million Veteran Program (MVP) on genome research has now enrolled more than 670,000 Veteran volunteers, to make it by far the world's largest genome database.

    In the program, begun in 2011, participants donate blood, from which DNA is extracted. Then a baseline and periodic follow-up surveys track the Veterans' military careers, and their health and lifestyles.

    The research seeks to determine whether the genetic information in the database could hold keys to preventing and treating diseases.

    "We believe MVP will accelerate our understanding of disease detection, progression, prevention and treatment by combining this rich clinical, environmental and genomic data," former VA Secretary Dr. David Shulkin said.

    The MVP research opened the possibility for determining whether genetic factors were contributors to PTSD and Gulf War illness, Ramoni said.

    Many Veterans shared the same experiences in the same places in combat, and others were in the same places in the Gulf War; some developed PTSD and Gulf War illness, others didn't, Ramoni said.

    "The question we all ask is, why is that? Are there genetic markers for PTSD susceptibility, or are there genetic markers for Gulf War illness? Genes might help reveal that," she said.

    Source

    #veterans #military #amputees #womenvets

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  • DVA Logo 005

     

    Today the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced the appointment of a new chairwoman and four new members to the Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, an expert panel that advises the VA Secretary on issues and programs of importance to women Veterans, their families and caregivers.

  • Ponies Up

     

    TheLos Angeles City Council approved funding to build a homeless shelter for homeless Veterans.

    LOS ANGELES, CA — A proposal to fund the city's portion of a temporary homeless shelter to be located on the West Los Angeles Veterans Administration campus was approved by the Los Angeles City Council Friday.

    Under a partnership, the city and county of Los Angeles will split the cost of the construction of the $5 million facility, and the Department of Veterans Affairs will provide on-site services.

    The City Council unanimously approved a motion seeking funding for the facility, which is to be located on the grounds of the VA campus.

    It will provide transitional housing beds for up to 100 homeless Veterans, along with laundry facilities, personal hygiene centers, 24-hour security and supportive services.

    "This is a really big deal for Veterans that the VA is finally starting to deliver, and I'm really glad that the city of Los Angeles and the county are helping them deliver," Councilman Mike Bonin said earlier this week at a Homelessness and Poverty Committee meeting before it moved the motion forward.

    The facility is scheduled to open in early 2019, and will be one of several new programs and facilities at the site aimed at helping homeless Vets.

    The VA also is working on its Draft Master Plan, which calls for 1,200 units of permanent supportive housing on the Westside campus.

    The VA additionally has opened a "safe parking" program for Veterans living in their vehicles, and started providing permanent supportive housing for homeless Veterans in existing buildings, with 54 Veterans currently housed in Building 209.

    With financial support from the city through HHH bond funds, two other buildings are being converted into permanent supportive housing for Veterans.

    The facility will be part of Mayor Eric Garcetti's "A Bridge Home" program, which calls for temporary homeless facilities in each of the city's 15 council districts. One temporary facility in Councilman Jose Huizar's district near the El Pueblo Historic Monument has already opened, with other sites at various stages of development.

    The VA bridge housing site will include two tension membrane structures along with modular trailers that will not be visible from the exterior of the VA campus, according to Bonin's motion.

    Source

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  • VA Failed Her

     

    She served her country for more than two decades but now believes the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is letting her down.

  • Female Vets Am Legion

     

    The Veterans of American Legion Post 204 ― the “Service Girls” ― as they’re known in their Pacific Northwest home, are speaking out about the American Legion’s membership policies, which currently exclude the spouses of female Veterans in every branch of their organization.

    The former commander of Post 204 and 35-year Army Veteran Carrol Stripling is getting ready to file a third resolution with the American Legion since 2015. Her first two resolutions were denied. Stripling said the denials were representative of a culture that hasn’t always respected the needs of female Vets.

    “We don’t want our service undervalued any longer,” Stripling said at a June 23 meeting in Bothell, Wash.

    Founded in 1946, Post 204 is one of the few all-female American Legion posts across the country. Located in Washington state, the post is open to any female service members who’d like to join.

    “We call ourselves Post two-zero-four ― never two-oh-four ― because it makes [people] remember our name and who we are,” said Sandy Cooper, a retired Air Force Veteran and the first female USAF fire chief.

    “As a woman Veteran, you can’t be average. You have to be better than the men to get respect,” Cooper continued.

    Respect is why Post 204 came into being. Born out of what the women said was a need for sharing in a way only female Vets can understand, the service members said they support each other in and out of meetings without judgment.

    But they said they also have a looming concern about the organization that has come to offer them so much comradery: they want the same benefits their male counterparts are offered. They want their husbands to have a place within the American Legion organization.

    Elizabeth Bissett, retired Army Veteran, echoes the concerns of the other members. “I want to be able to have a male auxiliary … all of us are in the same boat and we don’t have an official auxiliary,” Bissett said.

    The American Legion history

    Since it was chartered by Congress in 1919, the American Legion, or The Legion, is the largest wartime Veterans’ nonprofit organization.

    According to The Legion’s website, it was developed by “war-weary Vets from World War I” and it quickly grew into a unique reprieve for service members to connect.

    The organization offers a network for Vets to grow friendships, bonding over volunteering events and activities, as well as unifying members through shared experiences. The Legion prides itself on patriotism and support for its 2.4 million members across the nation, according to its mission statement.

    The American Legion Auxiliary (ALA), developed the same year as The Legion, is a club for spouses of male Veterans, as well as daughters of Veterans.

    Essentially, it’s a place for women to lend support for each other and their service members.

    The ALA offers similar kinship and events, offering “support to The American Legion and to honor the sacrifice of those who serve…” according to the ALA mission.

    Likewise, The Sons of the American Legion (SAL) is an organization that offers membership to sons of Veterans.

    While these organizations have independent rules and statutes which dictate membership eligibility, all are inclusive to most relatives of Veterans. But none offer memberships to spouses of female Veterans, despite a growing concern.

    Female membership in the military

    In 1948, the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act was passed by Congress, allowing women to have a permanent place in the military. But long before it was a law, women have inserted themselves in military efforts dating back to the late 18th century.

    Today, women represent 16 percent of all enlisted service members and 18 percent of officers. These numbers are up from 1973, when women represented 2 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

    The influx of female armed service members over the last 40 years are not reflected in the American Legion’s membership policies, which haven’t changed since it began in 1919, despite The Legion’s declining membership numbers.

    While there are more active female Legion members today, there’s still no place for their spouses to gather in support of their service.

    “You know, my husband has said to me, ‘if there were other husbands here that I had a way to network with, we could go out and have a golf outing or we could do this or that,' so there is a need and an interest in networking,” Cooper said.

    Membership eligibility and the American Legion Auxiliary

    The complicated issue of changing policy to include male spouses of female Vets in the ALA is determined by different factors. These factors dictate how and if the constitution of the American Legion Auxiliary can be amended.

    ALA National Secretary and Executive Director Mary “Dubbie” Buckler released a statement in 2015 on the subject: “The American Legion Auxiliary is a separate corporation, incorporated as an all-female organization with our own Tax Identification and our own IRS Group Exemption independent from The American Legion. As such, we cannot amend our American Legion Auxiliary bylaws to change membership eligibility because our Articles of Incorporation filed with the government already prohibits it.”

    She went on to say: “The American Legion Auxiliary is both incorporated and constituted as an all-female organization and our national governing documents cannot conflict with The American Legion’s governing documents. The American Legion National Constitution Article 13, Section 2 specifically limits membership in the American Legion Auxiliary to females, as specified consistently in everything published stating membership eligibility criteria. Therefore, any changes to membership eligibility in The American Legion Auxiliary would first require a constitutional amendment to both the Legion and ALA constitutions and an amendment by the federal government to the IRS Code, which is considered very unlikely.”

    The Vets of Post 204 say the long explanation is an excuse by the American Legion and the Auxiliary so they won’t lose their standing as a federal charter.

    “They’re worried about losing their federal charter. If you leave [the tax code] the way it is, nobody can mess with it,” Stripling said. “Before we went to Panama and Grenada, the Legion went to the IRS and said, ‘You know, we are all dying, we will have no members … so let’s let some of those Cold War Veterans in’ and the IRS said, ‘Sure.’ … So you can see it’s a misnomer.”

    Another explanation came from the American Legion Frequently Asked Questions Guide in a 2013 document citing that the need for male spouses to have a separate auxiliary would be arbitrary.

    In direct response to the question of why female spouses don’t have a separate organization, the document read: “Over the last few years, Internal Affairs has had a few resolutions on male spouses of female Veterans (either to join SAL or to establish a separate male auxiliary) that were considered by various Convention Committees and all were rejected … it was unanimously decided that the American Legion is a wartime Veterans’ organization and not a social organization. Each of the three organizations has specific requirements for membership with specific purposes and to add spouses either male or as defined by specific states would not add value to our organizations.”

    American Legion Auxiliary headquarters did not respond to further questions on the subject of membership eligibility.

    What comes next?

    Master Sgt. Kacie Chiappini, a current Air Force reservist from the Youngstown Air Reserve Station in Vienna, Ohio, said she joined the American Legion because it was a way to bond with her WWII Veteran grandfather.

    “My grandfather was the last WWII [Veteran] still living that was a member at our post and we would meet him there a lot before he passed away. He loved it there … but it was mostly [him] that got me going there,” Chiappini said.

    Like the women of Post 204, Chiappini shares concerns over why her husband can’t join the club where she’s had so many fond experiences.

    “To me, it’s mostly principle,” Chiappini said. “It needs to change.”

    Chiappini brought the issue up to her commanding officer Lt. Col. John Boccieri. Boccieri is a also a member of the American Legion and a former U.S. congressman in Ohio’s 16th District.

    “I, too, was startled by the fact that the American Legion will not permit spouses of female service members to join the auxiliary organization. Permitting a family to honor all Veterans in such an esteemed organization as the American Legion can only strengthen the respect we pay to all Veterans, whether male or female,” Boccieri said.

    The movement for change is in early stages as more female Vets question the policies of The Legion.

    However, the women of Post 204 want Vets like Chiappini, and every other female service member, to have the opportunity for a male auxiliary in support of their service in the near future.

    Stripling, Cooper and Bissett shared their frustrations over previous efforts to file resolutions and how their voices, seemingly lost before having a chance to use them, may not be enough to spark the necessary measures of change.

    “These resolutions we filed, they go to committees, but sometimes they don’t even reach the committees because the staff pulls them,” Stripling said. “The committees are appointed, but you don’t know which committee sees the resolution.”

    In the coming months, Stripling will file a third resolution with the American Legion, hoping this time it will make a difference.

    “I just think that changing the culture of The Legion will help change the whole culture in the military. That’s what we’re here for,” Stripling said.

    The women say they won’t stop until The Legion recognizes the need for a male auxiliary in support of female Veterans, whose service is just as valuable as their male counterparts.

    “We’re gonna fight. And we’re eventually gonna get it,” Bissett said.

    Source

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  • Homeless Female

     

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The number of female homeless Veterans is on the rise.

    A home was dedicated Thursday in Maplewood to honor their service by helping some women Veterans in their time of need.

    A five-bedroom, four-bath home is the result of a partnership between the Builders Association of the Twin Cities, Lennar homes and Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans.

    MAC-V will take five homeless female Veterans and place them in this structured independent living home. There will also be services to help these Veterans get the resources they need.

    “We’re going to come around them with wraparound services, case manage all the way through and we stay with them for two years and beyond to make sure that they’re getting stabilized.”

    There are 30,000 female Veterans in Minnesota. Twenty women are currently on the registry for housing.

    Source

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  • Womens Mental Health

    Women currently comprise approximately 16 percent of the United States military. As of 2016, service women are permitted to serve in any military position for which they meet the gender-neutral performance standards and requirements. These expanded roles have increased the cadre of responsibilities that service women have, as well as increased their potential challenges. As such, it is more important than ever for military leadership, researchers, and health care providers to understand women’s health.

    The Departments of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Defense (DOD) collaborated to host the National VA/DOD Women's Mental Health Mini-Residency Aug. 28-30 in Arlington, Virginia. This mini-residency brought together more than 150 VA and DOD mental health providers so they could gain knowledge and skills in the provision of gender-sensitive care to women Veterans and service members. Specific topics included:

    • Complex trauma
    • Psychopharmacology
    • Safety planning
    • Suicide prevention
    • Compassion fatigue
    • Sexual functioning
    • Impact of health conditions
    • Ostracism, and many others

    During the mini-residency, attendees developed an action plan to disseminate these best practices and facilitate practice change at their local facilities -- to optimize women's mental health care in VA and DOD. Requests from DOD mental health providers to attend in person far exceeded the number of spots available, so we posted all DOD presentations and posters on the mini-residency website for you to read, download and share with colleagues.

    Today also marks the start of Women’s Health Month, a time to highlight women’s health, to include the mental health of service women. Throughout the month, we will showcase some of the exciting presentations from the mini-residency through our Clinician’s Corner blog series.

    Dr. Nancy Skopp, PHCoE research psychologist, will describe the impact of gender stereotypes on diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Laura Miller of the Hines Jr. VA Hospital in Hines, Illinois, will highlight mental health across the female lifespan, and Dr. Margaret Altemus of the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, will discuss perinatal and postpartum depression. Dr. Lauren Messina of the Consortium for Health and Military Performance will discuss a total force fitness approach to physical and mental health, which can help women and men improve their emotional health and manage symptoms of mental health disorders.

    For updated research and resources, be sure to check out our Women’s Mental Health webpage and follow us on Facebook for more women’s mental health-related posts and resources. Like, comment and share on your channels so we can promote women’s health awareness, and particularly the importance of women’s mental health, during October.

    Source

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  • Sexual assault 003

     

    The Defense Department in September released a first-of-its-kind study that estimates the risk of sexual assault service members face at different installations. The estimates were based on more than 170,000 survey responses service members completed in 2014 on whether they had personally experienced sexual assault. The data has limitations, but military officials will use it to help identify high-risk areas and see what additional steps can be taken to increase safety for men and women assigned there. The data is searchable by service, risk, location and estimated number of assaults.

    Service members can use the chart below, drawn from the detailed data tables published by RAND, to search for individual military installations and ships.

    The study conducted by the Rand Corporation includes two key measurements:

    Overall Sexual Assault Risk: This number indicates the average expected risk for the average men and women at the individual installations. For example, a 10 percent risk for sexual assault means it’s likely that one in 10 service members at that installation or ship will experience a sexual assault during the year. This number is affected by many factors, such as the age, rank or gender of the personnel assigned there. For example, installations with many younger, unmarried and junior ranking personnel (all risk factors) tend to have higher risk solely based on those demographic risk factors.

    Installation-specific risk: This number measures the risk for sexual assault that controls for all those personal factors and aims to more directly answer the question: Are individuals more at risk for a sexual assault here than elsewhere? This installation-specific risk may be associated with installation characteristics such as command climate, the community outside the gates of the installation, or other factors. A positive number indicates service members at that installation face an elevated risk for sexual assault, and a negative number indicates the risk there is lower than expected for a base of that size and demographic. For example, an installation with an installation-specific risk of 1 percent (or -1 percent) means that troops at that location are one percent more likely (or less likely) to experience a sexual assault compared to the average for a base of that size and demographic. To calculate installation-specific risk, RAND employed a number of analytical tools and computer models to create its best estimate on the probability a service member may face sexual assault at that location. The percentages reported are RAND’s best estimate based on its analysis of the 2014 survey data.

    Sexual assaults by service, gender and location

    (Click Source to view charts)

    Source

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  • Rehab Employment

     

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VR&E) recently began the process of reducing the average counselor-to-caseload ratio, to one to 125 or below, through the hiring of 172 vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRCs).

    The hiring effort, which began early this summer, will help improve service to Veterans with service-connected disabilities and employment barriers, as well as help provide them with expedited services to improve their ability to transition to the civilian workforce.

    “The VR&E program is much more than a benefits program,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “It’s a vital support network, where VA’s expert counselors work closely with Veterans on their personalized vocational rehabilitation goals. Congressional funding enables us to expand our team of counselors who are on the ground across the country working tirelessly for Veterans, and we appreciate their support.”

    VA is committed to ensuring its counselors have manageable caseloads and the resources needed to ensure Veterans are receiving thorough, quality services.

    Currently, 941 counselors are working across VA’s 56 regional offices, as well as in out-based and satellite locations.

    Once hiring is complete for the additional 172 counselors, a total of 1,113 VRCs will be deployed in the field to serve Veterans. This includes 905 VRCs at regional and out-based offices, 132 Integrated Disability Evaluation System counselors at 71 military installations and 76 Veteran Success on Campus counselors at 105 institutions of higher learning.

    Since 2014, over 56,000 Veterans have either completed a rehabilitation plan, are employed or have achieved a greater independence in living through VR&E assistance. The VR&E program currently has more than 123,000 participants. For more information about VR&E, visit www.benefits.va.gov/vocrehab/.

    Source

    #Veterans #military #employment #Veteransaffairs

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  • Website Updates 002 

  • Women Vets Health 001

     

    Treating women Veterans

    Patty Axtell, RN, and Suzanne Rainforth, LPN, (pictured above) practice pelvic exam supply setup with instructor Jonna Brenton, RN, at Grand Island VAMC. The number of women Veterans is increasing rapidly. Consequently, the number of women Veterans receiving health care from VA tripled from between 2000 and 2016, growing from 160,000 in 2000 to 475,000 in 2016, driving an increase in need for high-quality, gender-specific health care.

    As of May 2017, 26 percent of enrolled women Veterans lived in rural and highly rural areas. These are areas in need of more trained primary care providers designated as Women’s Health Primary Care Providers (WH-PCPs) and nursing staff trained in women’s health.

    Since 2008, the Women’s Health Services (WHS) has developed and delivered a comprehensive education and training model for clinical staff, called the Women’s Health Mini-Residency, to address gaps in knowledge and skills in women’s health topics. This training is traditionally a three-day, face-to-face program offered 1-2 times per year in Orlando, Florida.

    Although more than 3,500 PCPs and 1,200 primary care nurses trained in this mini-residency model, additional training needs persist, including for staff in rural VA facilities.

    WHS understands that rural VA clinics, with fewer staff, may face challenges sending staff off-site for training without disrupting normal clinic operations. Travel from rural areas also means more time away from clinical care.

    Bringing the training to clinic sites

    To better support women Veterans’ long-term health and well-being, address staff training need and minimize the burden on the clinic and staff, WHS, funded by the Office of Rural Health (ORH), launched a blended learning approach to the Women’s Health Mini-Residency intended for providers and nurses at rural Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOC) and VA medical centers (VAMC) by bringing this training program directly to clinic sites. This modified mini-residency includes:

    • Core women’s health courses on topics such as abnormal uterine bleeding, contraception, breast issues and intimate partner violence offered via the Veteran Affairs’ Talent Management System (TMS) and done independently in advance of the one-day training delivered directly at clinic sites
    • Tailored one-day on-site training includes interactive portions of the program such as facilitated case discussions, simulation equipment for hands-on activities, videos of gynecologic procedures and exams, and live models for breast and pelvic exam instruction

    Patient-Aligned Care Team (PACT) providers and nurses train side-by-side in this inter-professional training program, which aligns with how care is provided. In all, each provider and nurse will receive more than 18 hours of accredited medical training. Launched June 2018, in partnership with ORH, WHS will provide this mini-residency for rural providers and nurses in up to 40 rural clinical sites per year to support the highest level of care for women Veterans in rural areas.

    If you have any questions about the Women’s Health Mini-Residency for Rural Providers and Nurses, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    Source

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  • PTSD Women

     

    There are far more men than women Veterans in the VA system. For this reason, many women Veterans are not aware of resources offered just for them. Many women Veterans prefer treatment with other women.

    Research shows that people often do better in treatment with others that are more like them. As a result, mental health services just for women are offered in many VA’s across the country.

    VA Women Veterans Program Managers

    Every VA Medical Center in the country has a Women Veterans Program Manager. This person is your advocate. She can help you get to VA services and programs, state and federal benefits, and resources in the area where you live.

    If you need help:

    If you have questions about your VA care, you should first go to your Women Veterans Program Manager. During normal business hours, you can also contact:

    • The Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Women Veterans at (202) 273-6193
    • The Veterans Health Administration Women Veterans Health Strategic Health Care Group at (202) 461-1070

    Types of VA programs for women

    The following list describes some of the mental health service programs offered by VA for women Veterans. To find out more, see VA PTSD Treatment Programs. The fact sheet links to a list of VA PTSD treatment programs. The list includes programs for women, with contact information. For other help locating a program or service, you should ask your Women Veterans Program Manager.

    • Women's Stress Disorder Treatment Teams (WSDTTs). WSDTTs are special outpatient (not live-in) mental health programs. They focus on treatment of PTSD and other problems related to trauma.
    • Specialized inpatient and residential programs for women. These are live-in programs for women Veterans who need more intense treatment and support. While in these programs, women live either in the hospital or in a residence with other women. For help locating a program, ask your Women Veterans Program Manager.
    • Cohort treatment or separate wings for women. These programs are like the live-in programs discussed above except these programs accept both men and women. Some programs accept women in groups that start treatment together on a certain date. Sometimes the program has a space set apart for women.
    • Women Veterans Comprehensive Health Centers. Complete health centers for women Veterans are located in many VA's around the country. Many of them provide outpatient mental health services to women Veterans. Check with your local Women Veterans Program Manager to see if there is a women's health center that provides mental health services near you.
    • Women Veterans Homelessness Programs. The Women Veterans Program can help you find shelter if you are homeless or at risk of being homeless. Certain VA locations have programs for homeless women Veterans and homeless women Veterans with children. Contact your Women Veterans Program Manager for resources near you. You can also contact the Social Work Services department at your local VAMC. For more information, go to Homeless Veterans.

    For more information

    To learn more about women and traumatic stress, please see this section of materials Specific to Women.

    Source

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