Veterans-For-Change.org

VFC Visitors Counter

004920201
TodayToday1879
YesterdayYesterday2147
This WeekThis Week10411
This MonthThis Month74445
All DaysAll Days4920201
Highest 06-21-2016 : 17814
IP: 52.200.130.163
Logged In Users 0
Guests 70
Registered Users 1856
Registered Today 0

Latest News

VA News

VA Receives $25 Million Donation to Provide Genetic Testing for Veterans

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

25 Million Donation

 

A billionaire philanthropist has donated $25 million to the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide genetic tests for Veterans to help tailor their medical treatments and medications.

The VA and Denny Sanford, a South Dakota banker and Air Force Reserve Veteran, announced the gift March 12. The money is expected to help up to 250,000 Veterans through 2022, starting with those who have received a cancer diagnosis.

According to Sanford Health, the hospital system named for Sanford after he donated $400 million in 2007, the gift will fund the testing program, called Pharmacogenomics Action for Cancer Survivorship, or PHASeR. It aims to use a Veteran's DNA to determine personalized treatment and reduce costly adverse drug reactions.

During the announcement of the donation at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., VA Secretary Robert Wilkie said the gift will help shape future treatment for all Veterans who receive care at VA.

"The pharmacogenetic testing that we are going to be using as a result of Mr. Sanford's generosity is critical for our nation's Veterans," Wilkie said. "We are all committed to active engagement with medicine and science ... to bring our Veterans the very best care."

Dr. Deepak Voora, with the Duke University School of Medicine's Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, will oversee the program; a pilot is expected to launch at the Durham, N.C. VA Health System later this year.

"As a physician, it's hard to predict exactly how a patient will respond to a medicine," Voora said at the announcement event. "But this pharmacogenetic testing program can change that by indicating how patients might respond to medications before they even take them."

He added that specialized pharmacogenetic testing largely has been out of reach for VA patients due to cost.

The program is expected to be available at 125 sites by 2022. Test will be taken at local VA facilities and processed at a Sanford Health facility in South Dakota. The tests will examine genetic markers to determine how patients tolerate and metabolize different types of drugs, including antidepressants, blood thinners and pain medications.

Sanford Health plans to supplement Sanford's gift with a matching fundraising effort.

"We recognize that our patients who are Veterans are coming to us with something special on their mind and in their experiences," Sanford Health CEO Kelby Krabbenhoft said. "This is a natural way for all of us at Sanford Health to give back."

Denny Sanford, 83, made his fortune, estimated by Forbes to be at $2.2 billion, in banking and credit card companies. He said on Fox News Sunday on March 17 that he plans to die broke, having given away his fortune. To date, he has donated $1.6 billion to causes that include health care research and services, neglected children, the University of Minnesota, education, the San Diego Children's Zoo, stem cell and breast cancer research.

"It's a joy to help other people," he told Chris Wallace. "I will die broke. Everything is committed to different organizations."

Source

VA releases health care inspection reports and staffing data for more than 100 Community Living Centers

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

DVA Logo 33

 

Today, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) began publicly posting, for the first time, health care inspection reports and staffing data for its nursing home system.

To date, VA has posted 101 health inspection reports of its 134 Community Living Centers (CLCs) with the remainder scheduled to be posted by October 2019.

The health care inspection reports, which cover April 2018 to present, are available here. In the future, VA will post the reports annually.

The health care inspection reports show that, in comparison with non-VA facilities rated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), VA has a lower number of low-performing facilities (VA: 17.2 percent, non-VA: 19.7 percent) and a higher number of higher-performing facilities (VA: 17.2 percent, non-VA: 10.8 percent).

“Overall, VA’s nursing home system compares closely with private sector nursing homes, though the department on average cares for sicker and more complex patients in its nursing homes than do private facilities,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie.

Many VA nursing home residents are being treated for conditions such as prostate obstruction, spinal cord injury, mental illness, homelessness, post-traumatic stress disorder, combat injury, terminal illness and other conditions rarely seen in private nursing homes. In fact, 42 percent of 41,076 VA CLC residents in fiscal 2018 had a service-connected disability rating of 50 percent or higher.

When comparing VA CLCs with private sector nursing homes, the VA CLCs care for more complex Veterans with Veteran-specific conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (11.6 percent vs. 0.5 percent) and traumatic brain injury (1.7 percent vs. 0.8 percent) in addition to the VA CLCs providing more hospice-related care to include hospice care (10.3 percent vs. 3.7 percent), chemotherapy (1.2 percent vs. 0.4 percent) and radiation therapy (1.4 percent vs. 0.1 percent).

Further, the overall star rating for VA’s nursing homes compared with the 15,487 private sector nursing homes rated by the CMS shows that VA has a significantly lower percentage of one-star, or lowest rated, facilities than the rest of the nation. VA’s latest ratings show that only eight, roughly 6 percent, of VA’s nursing homes received an overall one-star rating.

For more information about VA nursing homes, see here and here. About the reports

The inspection reports are based on yearly, unannounced inspections conducted by an outside contracted agency. As part of the reports, survey teams look at many aspects of life at VA nursing homes, including:

  • The care of residents and the processes used to give that care.
  • How the staff and residents interact.
  • The nursing home environment.

Surveyors also review residents’ clinical records, interview residents and family members, as well as caregivers and administrative staff.

Source

VA’s Private Care Program Headed for Tech Trouble, Review Finds

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Private Care

 

“These people are out of their minds,” one VA doctor said.

As the Trump administration prepares to launch a controversial program to expand private medical care for veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs is developing a software tool to determine who’s eligible.

But the tool is so flawed, according to an independent review obtained by ProPublica, that it threatens to disrupt the health care of about 75,000 veterans every day.

“This degradation goes against the spirit of the Mission Act to improve the veterans experience and quality of care,” the review said, referring to the 2018 law that authorized the program to expand private care. The program is supposed to start in less than three months.

The review was conducted by the U.S. Digital Service, an elite group of software developers and designers employed by the White House to help federal agencies improve their technology. The USDS team said the VA should scrap the eligibility tool and start over.

The VA needs authorization from Congress to cover the $5.6 million cost of completing work on the eligibility tool, the department said in a March 4 letter to a House appropriations subcommittee. The panel has not yet acted on the request.

On Monday evening, shortly after this article was published House veterans affairs committee chairman Mark Takano called the findings by the USDS “incredibly alarming” and said his panel would hold a hearing to scrutinize the VA’s funding request.

VA spokesman Curt Cashour declined to comment on the USDS review, saying it “remains a work in progress.” The USDS didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The USDS report raised concerns that the eligibility tool was designed in a way that wouldn’t work for VA doctors. The report predicted that the tool would generate errors or run slowly or crash. These glitches would lengthen each appointment by five to 10 minutes, the USDS team estimated, which equates to being able to treat 75,000 fewer veterans every day systemwide.

The USDS said the contractor building the software — a Virginia-based company called AbleVets — is “motivated and capable”; the problem, according to the report, is the task that the VA assigned was rushed and poorly conceived. The tool has to pull data from six separate VA systems, but those connections won’t be set up in time, the USDS found. There also won’t be enough time to test the tool and address any errors, according to the report.

Doctors could balk, interviews conducted by the USDS team indicated. As the leader of primary care physicians at one VA medical center said in the report, “I will instruct every one of my PCPs not to do this.”

Another unnamed physician said of administrators who expect doctors to use the tool: “These people are out of their minds. We aren’t housekeepers, doorkeepers, garbage men.”

A bug in the Mission Act rollout would add to a string of high-profile IT failures for the VA. Last year, the VA’s software system delayed and miscalculated stipends for student veterans under the GI Bill, leading to veterans getting evicted and having their credit scores ruined. The agency’s effort to overhaul its electronic health records has suffered from leadership turmoil and rising costs. The VA blamed its technology infrastructure for delaying the expansion of benefits for family members who take care of injured veterans.

“The Department of Veterans Affairs, as these committees have noted on more than one occasion, has an IT problem,” VA Secretary Robert Wilkie acknowledged at a congressional hearing in December. The VA lacked a permanent IT chief until January; for most of last year, the IT division was led by a Trump campaign alumnus who closely coordinated with three men at Mar-a-Lago whom the president gave sweeping influence over the VA.

Wilkie has said the Mission Act will “revolutionize VA health care as we know it.” But the USDS review said the agency is making only “piecemeal updates” to existing policies and procedures, and has conducted little research to understand how veterans, doctors and staff actually use private care.

The report recommended starting over on a simpler tool that wouldn’t be a drain on doctors’ time because it could be used by nurses or clerks, or even by veterans themselves. The USDS said the simpler tool could be done in time for the private care program’s launch in June.

AbleVets’ CEO, Wyatt Smith, declined to comment.

If the VA doesn’t provide a tool for veterans to check their own eligibility, patients may get into arguments with staff about whether they’re entitled to private care, the report warned, leading “to the public perception that the criteria are arbitrary, inconsistent, or unfair.”

That concern recalls the confusion surrounding the 2014 rollout of an earlier private care program that the Mission Act is replacing. At that time, a convoluted procedure for authorizing and scheduling appointments in the private sector led many veterans to wait more than 30 days, even though getting care faster was the point of the program, according to the VA inspector general.

“I remember very well in 2014 the fiasco that occurred there,” Rep. Phil Roe, the top Republican on the House veterans committee, said at the December hearing. “I’d rather keep doing exactly what we’re doing and implement it a month later than have this thing fall on its face.”

Source

Precision health initiative brings genetic testing to Veterans

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

DVA Logo 36

 

VA and Sanford Health join forces to provide free screenings, improve patient care for cancer survivors

WASHINGTON — Today the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced that, as part of an innovative partnership, VA and Sanford Health, one of the nation’s largest nonprofit health care systems, will soon provide free genetic testing to some Veterans cared for by VA.

The VA PHarmacogenomics Action for cancer SuRvivorship (PHASeR) testing program will begin a pilot program this year at the Durham VA Health Care System that will enroll all cancer survivors who receive treatment at the facility. The program eventually will expand to enrolling some 250,000 U.S. Veterans at 125 sites.

A recent Dartmouth study found that VA medical centers “outperform private hospitals in most health care markets throughout the country.”

VA Secretary Robert Wilkie lauded the partnership, and said relationships like this will continue to expand the department’s delivery of world class health care.

“This screening test will help providers at the VA prescribe the most appropriate medications at the right dose for cancer survivors,” Wilkie said. “Our goal is to continue delivering the best care possible for our nation’s heroes, and this partnership helps us do just that.”

PHASeR is funded by a $25 million gift from philanthropist Denny Sanford, for whom the health system is named, and an effort by Sanford Health to raise matching funds. The test can help providers determine which medications will be most effective for patients, improving access to appropriate treatments and reducing adverse drug reactions, which research shows costs up to $30 billion per year.

The test results will help with clinical decision making for all types of prescribed medications, including cardiovascular and mental health diseases and pain management. Veterans will be able to access the test at their local VA facilities, and Sanford Health will process the tests at its South Dakota-based Imagenetics facility.

"We have seen firsthand how this testing can positively influence patient care,” said Kelby Krabbenhoft, president and CEO of Sanford Health. “Through the generosity of Mr. Sanford, we are proud to join VA to make the test available to our nation’s Veterans.”

Sanford Imagenetics began in 2014, and more than 90 percent of patients who have been tested have been found to carry a genetic change that could affect medication selection or dosing. Test results are shared with physicians through the electronic medical record to ensure efficiency and accuracy in choosing treatments.

For more information on the PHASeR testing program resources for Veterans visit here.

Source

More than 800 Veterans receive direct access at Montgomery Veterans Experience Action Center

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

800 Veterans

 

One-stop access events

On Feb. 6,VA sponsored the Veterans Experience Action Center in the Multiplex at Cramton Bowl Multiplex in Montgomery, Alabama. VA staff members were on hand to process and provide updates on claims and appeals.

State, local and other federal agencies collaborated to provide information on housing, insurance, health care, employment, bereavement and mental health counseling. And a VA mobile Vet center was also on standby for those Veterans making a transition back into civilian life.

Thousands of Veterans and their family members turned out for the event. Many found the center useful, such as Veteran John Campbell, who drove from South Carolina.

“I learned more in 45 minutes than the 5 years my paperwork has been processing,” he said.

MCampbell is not alone. Many Veterans complain about the lag in wait time which can be attributed to backlogs and miscommunication. In some cases, Veterans simply do not understand the filing protocols and benefits available to them, according to Gerald Ruffin, a volunteer peer support specialist.

That’s why VA is hosting these events across the country.

More than 800 Veterans attended, also bringing their family members and friends. Nearly half of the Veterans received services of some kind, 107 claims and 15 appeals were processed, 38 enrolled in VA health care, 120 received information from NCA, 450 took home a VA Welcome Kit, and 44 received their claims decision and rating on-the-spot. $266,826 in retroactive compensation was granted during the event.

John Davis, a U.S. Army Veteran, had been waiting four years for a decision on his claim. After speaking with VBA representatives, he was able to expedite his paperwork. As this new initiative expands to other cities across the country, the Veterans Experience Action Center will promote more awareness and provide holistic care for our heroes and their families, caregivers, and survivors.

See news clips of the event here and here.

Source

Secretary Wilkie announces groundbreaking partnership between VA and Sanford Health

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Robert Wilkie 19

 

The VA PHarmacogenomics Action for cancer SuRvivorship (PHASeR) testing program will soon provide free genetic testing to some Veterans cared for by VA. The innovative partnership between VA and Sanford Health, one of the nation’s largest nonprofit health care systems, was unveiled today by VA Secretary Robert Wilkie during a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

The program will begin as a pilot this year at the Durham VA Health Care System where all cancer survivors who receive treatment at the facility will be enrolled. The program eventually will expand to enrolling some 250,000 Veterans at 125 sites.

PHASeR is funded by a $25 million gift from philanthropist Denny Sanford, for whom the health system is named, and an effort by Sanford Health to raise matching funds. The test can help providers determine which medications will be most effective for patients, improving access to appropriate treatments and reducing adverse drug reactions, which research shows costs up to $30 billion per year.

The test results will help with clinical decision making for all types of prescribed medications, including cardiovascular and mental health diseases and pain management. Veterans will be able to access the test at their local VA facilities, and Sanford Health will process the tests at its South Dakota-based Imagenetics facility.

VA Secretary Robert Wilkie lauded the partnership, and said relationships like this will continue to expand the department’s delivery of world class health care.

“This screening test will help providers at the VA prescribe the most appropriate medications at the right dose for cancer survivors,” Wilkie said. “Our goal is to continue delivering the best care possible for our nation’s heroes, and this partnership helps us do just that.”

Source

Dr. Ileana Howard and her “very important mission”

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Ileana Howard

 

Saluting one of VA’s Top Docs during Women’s History Month

When Ileana Howard (pictured above) was a trainee at the University of Washington, she didn’t know that caring for Veterans would become her life’s work.

When she was assigned to the VA Puget Sound Health Care System in the winter of 2005, it turned out to be a moment of clarity for her.

“When your work is providing health care for Veterans, you don’t just have a job, you’ve been entrusted with a very important mission,” said Howard, the outpatient medical director for Rehabilitation Care Services (RCS) at VA Puget Sound and a clinical associate professor of rehabilitation medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

“It’s incredible to be surrounded by coworkers who feel the same way,” said Howard.

As a young girl, Howard remembers being drawn to science. But she enjoyed working with people more than test tubes and found herself fascinated by the rehabilitative process once she entered medical school.

The focus of RCS is helping Veterans recover from neurological and musculoskeletal injuries to achieve their highest level of function and quality of life. It’s an area of care that presents challenges, but also an inspiration.

Inspired by Veterans’ heroism and self-sacrifice

“I am inspired by my Veterans not only for the heroism of their past accomplishments but for the dignity, grace, and self-sacrifice with which they often meet some of life’s most challenging health conditions,” said Howard.

Some of Howard’s most lasting contributions have come from working with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients. VA Puget Sound has been steadily growing its ALS treatment capability since 2013 when it partnered with the ALS Association Evergreen Chapter and Paralyzed Veterans of America to better serve Veterans with ALS and their families. Howard spearheaded this effort, and the next year, her team opened a clinic at VA Puget Sound’s American Lake campus in addition to the existing clinic in Seattle.

In 2018, she was awarded the Paralyzed Veterans of America Clinical Excellence Award for her work with the ALS program. Her innovations are also spreading across the nation. Clinics affiliated with Yale University, Duke University, Cleveland VA Medical Center and Atlanta VA Health Care System are now equipped with tools Howard’s team developed to enhance the quality of ALS patient care in the Pacific Northwest.

“Our ALS team guides Veterans living with ALS and their families throughout the journey and assists them in maximizing the various VA benefits that are available,” said Howard. “Our rehabilitative services are second to none, and we are very grateful for the benefits available to support these families. These include coordinated medical care, durable medical equipment, funding for home modifications, assistive technology, and services to aid in activities of daily living.”

Training next generation of rehabilitation physicians

Howard has shepherded the ALS rehabilitative care team through a series of certifications to demonstrate to her patients that VA care is as good or better than that available in the community. These acknowledgments have also better positioned the team as experts in service to rehabilitation teams caring for Veterans across the country.

Howard’s career has come full circle—now she trains the next generation of rehabilitation physicians throughout VA Puget Sound. Several of her students are already staff rehabilitation physicians at VA hospitals around the nation. She thinks it’s important for students to have the experience of serving, regardless of their ultimate career path.

A native of Federal Way, Wash., Howard is especially passionate about ensuring access to care for Veterans in the South Sound region. She attended school in Tacoma and is very grateful for the medical care her grandfather, a U.S. Army Veteran, received at the end of his life through the VA.

Providing virtual “house calls” with telehealth

Telehealth is one of the tools Howard uses to meet the health care needs of Veterans like her grandfather.

“It’s an incredible tool that allows us to provide the highest level of specialty care for our most disabled Veterans regardless of where they are located,” she said. “I’ve provided ‘house calls’ to Veterans in Eastern Montana as well as all the way to Alaska.

“Leaving their home is a huge challenge for these patients, so it’s a big relief when we can bring our services to them, even virtually,” she added.

Working alongside her team, Howard is a natural optimist who loves her work and appreciates the opportunity to serve Veterans.

“Providing rehabilitation services to our nation’s heroes is the most rewarding job I can imagine,” said Howard. “On a daily basis, we dispense both healthcare and hope.”

Source

Statement by Secretary Robert Wilkie on President Trump’s FY 2020 budget request

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Robert Wilkie 17

 

In President Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget, he has once again demonstrated his ongoing commitment to Veterans, ensuring greater quality, efficiency and timely service that our Veterans have earned and deserve.

The budget funds our highest priorities, including the Maintaining Internal Systems and Strengthening Integrated Outside Networks Act (MISSION Act) implementation, Electronic Health Record Modernization, Business Transformation and Customer Service. It also provides a significant increase for our top clinical priority — suicide prevention.

VA’s portion of the budget is based on its solid financial foundation. VA recently received its 20th consecutive clean audit opinion, the highest possible, by the Inspector General and a qualified audit firm.

With VA’s financial strength we are achieving noticeable results with the resources provided:

Dartmouth’s Annals of Internal Medicine reported that “VA health care is as good, or better, than any care our American people receive in any part of the country.”

Journal of the American Medical Association study found Veterans’ access to VA care “appears to have improved between 2014 and 2017 and appears to have surpassed access in the private sector for three of the four specialties evaluated.”

VA has rapidly moved beyond being on the cusp of the most significant transformation in VA’s history to being fully immersed in the transformation campaign. The FY 2020 budget reflects this reality.

Source

VA strengthens care and benefits for Veterans with $220 billion budget

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

VA Budget

 

President Donald J. Trump is proposing a total of $220.2 billion in his fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), a 9.6 percent increase above fiscal 2019.

“The budget request will ensure the nation’s Veterans receive high-quality health care and timely access to benefits and services,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “The budget supports the most significant transformation of VA since its inception, positioning the department as the premier provider for Veterans’ services and benefits. This is a significant increase in VA funding and demonstrates the administration’s commitment to supporting our Veterans.”

The FY 2020 budget includes $97 billion (an increase of $6.8 billion, or 7.5 percent) in discretionary funding, including resources for health care, benefit administration, and national cemeteries, as well as $123.2 billion (an increase of $12.3 billion or 11.1 percent) in mandatory funding above 2019 for benefit programs inclusive of Compensation and Pensions, Readjustment Benefits, Housing and Insurance. This budget provides robust funding for the secretary’s top priorities.

MISSION Act: $8.9 billion for implementation of the Maintaining Internal Systems and Strengthening Integrated Outside Networks Act of 2018 (MISSION Act) to provide greater choice on where Veterans receive their care, maintain care for current Choice Program users, provide a new urgent care benefit and expand the Caregivers program.

Electronic Health Record Modernization (EHRM): $1.6 billion ($496 million above FY 2019) to create and implement a single longitudinal electronic health record for military service members from their active duty to Veteran status, and ensure interoperability with the Department of Defense. The increase will support ongoing activities at the three initial deployment sites and the deployment to further sites, as well as additional site assessments.

Transforming Business Systems:Funds the continued deployment of a modern integrated financial and acquisition management system ($184.9 million) and implementation of the Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support ($36.7 million).

Improving Customer Service: $8.1 million to maintain VA’s trajectory of improving its customer service. The results of a recent customer-experience feedback survey of Veterans regarding their trust of the department’s health care outpatient services showed ”trust scores” for outpatient services increased from 84.7 percent in June 2017 to 87.9 percent in January 2019.

Preventing Veteran Suicide: $9.4 billion ($426 million above 2019) for mental health services, which includes $222 million for suicide-prevention outreach, a $15.6 million increase over 2019.

Women’s Health: $547 million ($42 million above 2019) for gender-specific women’s health care. This increase will help meet VA’s goals of developing Designated Women’s Health Primary Care Providers at every site where women access VA care, and improve the availability and quality of services to women Veterans.

Capital Investments: $1.6 billion for major and minor construction, including $410 million for the construction of a new hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, and $150 million for the Manhattan, New York, medical center.

Source

Precision health initiative brings genetic testing to Veterans

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

DVA Logo 32

 

Today the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced that, as part of an innovative partnership, VA and Sanford Health, one of the nation’s largest nonprofit health care systems, will soon provide free genetic testing to some Veterans cared for by VA.

The VA PHarmacogenomics Action for cancer SuRvivorship (PHASeR) testing program will begin a pilot program this year at the Durham VA Health Care System that will enroll all cancer survivors who receive treatment at the facility. The program eventually will expand to enrolling some 250,000 U.S. Veterans at 125 sites.

A recent Dartmouth study found that VA medical centers “outperform private hospitals in most health care markets throughout the country.”

VA Secretary Robert Wilkie lauded the partnership, and said relationships like this will continue to expand the department’s delivery of world class health care.

“This screening test will help providers at the VA prescribe the most appropriate medications at the right dose for cancer survivors,” Wilkie said. “Our goal is to continue delivering the best care possible for our nation’s heroes, and this partnership helps us do just that.”

PHASeR is funded by a $25 million gift from philanthropist Denny Sanford, for whom the health system is named, and an effort by Sanford Health to raise matching funds. The test can help providers determine which medications will be most effective for patients, improving access to appropriate treatments and reducing adverse drug reactions, which research shows costs up to $30 billion per year.

The test results will help with clinical decision making for all types of prescribed medications, including cardiovascular and mental health diseases and pain management. Veterans will be able to access the test at their local VA facilities, and Sanford Health will process the tests at its South Dakota-based Imagenetics facility.

“We have seen firsthand how this testing can positively influence patient care,” said Kelby Krabbenhoft, president and CEO of Sanford Health. “Through the generosity of Mr. Sanford, we are proud to join VA to make the test available to our nation’s Veterans.”

Sanford Imagenetics began in 2014, and more than 90 percent of patients who have been tested have been found to carry a genetic change that could affect medication selection or dosing. Test results are shared with physicians through the electronic medical record to ensure efficiency and accuracy in choosing treatments.

For more information on the PHASeR testing program resources for Veterans visit www.imagenetics.sanfordhealth.org/Veterans-genetic-testing/.

Source

Copyright © 2016. All Rights Reserved.